Women of Vision - Israeli Agencies
Organizations and individual applicants can apply.
Opens Oct 15 2020 08:45 (EDT)
Description

Women of Vision Foundation - Jewish Federation of Greater Philadelphia

2022-2023 Request for Proposals


The Women of Vision Foundation of the Jewish Federation of Greater Philadelphia invites organizations to submit a proposal for two years of funding in 2022-2023. The Women of Vision Foundation impacts the lives of Jewish women and girls across generations and geographic boundaries through strategic grant making, advocacy, and educational programs focused on social change. Two-year grants will be awarded to social change efforts in Israel for women and/or girls. 

Women of Vision supports social change programs that define or re-frame an issue, change people's behaviors, increase engagement, change policies or status, or maintain past gains. Organizations that can clearly define and illustrate how their program influences and brings about social change and social justice are strongly encouraged. To inform the deliberations, please provide programmatic and financial information. The deadline to submit a letter of intent (LOI) is Friday, November 13, 2020. Selected applicants will be invited to submit full proposals, due by Thursday February 18, 2021.

Required documentation for letters of intent (LOIs) includes proof of non-profit status, a projected two-year program budget, and a maximum 2-page (or 1,000 word) narrative. Required documentation for full proposals will be shared with applicants who advance to that stage.

Applicants are eligible for grants between $5,000 and $25,000 USD per-year. The grant term will be September 1, 2021 through August 31, 2023. 

Note: submission of a proposal does not guarantee funding.


Eligibility

  • Organizations in Israel that are a registered amuta with 46 status. 

  • New and existing programs are eligible for consideration. A grantee of Women of Vision may receive up to three cycles of funding. Once a grantee has reached the three cycle (six-year) threshold, they must take a one-cycle (two-year) funding hiatus.

  • Programs must focus on one of the following target areas: health & safety, empowerment, or economic security among women and/or girls.

  • Programs must articulate their social change vision. Please refer to the social change philanthropy guide enclosed below and include language applicable to your program. 


Strategic Funding Areas

Health and Safety: Recognizing the physical and mental health of women and girls as a human right and requirement to obtain full economic, religious, social and political achievement. Examples include but are not limited to:

  • domestic violence/victimization,

  • gun violence,

  • sex trafficking,

  • health & wellness.


Empowerment: Encouraging new and existing leaders among women and girls in ways that help them use their power and skills to affect social change, strengthen the Jewish community, gain personal empowerment and support aspiring female leaders. Examples include but are not limited to:

  • self-image,

  • education or life skills,

  • leadership development.

Economic Security: Increasing economic justice, financial stability and self-sufficiency for women and creating more fair and equal workplaces. Examples include but are not limited to:

  • economic empowerment,

  • professional development,

  • self-sufficiency,

  • legal reform. 

Process 

  • All letters of intent are due Friday, November 13, 2020.

  • Applications may be submitted through Jewish Federation of Greater Philadelphia’s web-based grant application platform:

  • Selected applicants will be contacted in January 2021, if they are asked to submit a full proposal. Additional information will be provided.


Questions may be directed to Talia Lidar, Manager, Israel Office, Jewish Federation at: tlidar@jewishphilly.org or 972.52.613.0757.


 Social Change Philanthropy

Women of Vision employs a social change philanthropy framework and does not provide funding for direct services. Below is a quick guide to Women of Vision’s definitions.  

Social Change Philanthropy focuses on the root causes of problems, working to improve the conditions that lead to inequality.  This approach is unlike traditional charity, which often seeks to ameliorate only the symptoms of societal problems, for example, by providing medicine and treatment for the sick, funds for the poor, or shelters for the homeless and battered.


How does social change occur?


Micro-level:  The change is reflected in the impact on individual lives.  For example: job attainment and retention, access to voting, access to reproductive rights and sex education. 

  

Macro-level:  The change is reflected in regional or national indicators.  For example: voting rates, teen pregnancy rates, unemployment rates, diminishing of environmental toxicity, reduction in gun violence.


Macro-level social change manifests itself in two primary ways:

  • Structural shifts in society’s institutions (usually policy driven):  anti-trafficking laws put into place, implementation of sex education in schools

  • Cultural shifts (usually driven by changes in behavior) couples sign legally binding pre-nuptial agreements that insure a “get” should the marriage fail. 

Social change categories:

  • A shift in Definition: the issue is defined differently in a community or society.

    • Example: rape is understood as an act of violence with legal and civil consequences, not as an act of transgression.  Often, small investment of resources can spark deep change, with the potential for profound impact.

  • A shift in Behavior: People in a community or society behave differently.

    • Example: women routinely self-conduct breast exams and obtain regular mammograms.  Often, small investment of resources can spark deep change, with the potential for profound impact.

  • A shift in Engagement: Advocacy and action are utilized as tools for reaching a critical mass to enable collective strength and impact.  

    • Example: Rabbis in a community agree to require the signing of a legally binding pre-nuptial agreement that insure a “get”.  To attain a shift in engagement usually requires large financial resources and years of attention, and multiple strategies.

  • A shift in Policies:  An institutional, organizational, or legislative policy or practice has changed and becomes the societal norm. These shifts usually require multiple years of investment, multiple strategies, and coalition building.

    • Example: local legislation is passed to increase minimum wage in a community.

  • Current position maintained: earlier progress on issues is maintained in the face of opposition.

    • Example: funding for breast cancer research is saved from budget cuts. Resources needed depend on the scale of resistance.  This work is complex and requires alignment and the collaboration of a wide array of groups and policy makers.

Apply

Women of Vision - Israeli Agencies


Women of Vision Foundation - Jewish Federation of Greater Philadelphia

2022-2023 Request for Proposals


The Women of Vision Foundation of the Jewish Federation of Greater Philadelphia invites organizations to submit a proposal for two years of funding in 2022-2023. The Women of Vision Foundation impacts the lives of Jewish women and girls across generations and geographic boundaries through strategic grant making, advocacy, and educational programs focused on social change. Two-year grants will be awarded to social change efforts in Israel for women and/or girls. 

Women of Vision supports social change programs that define or re-frame an issue, change people's behaviors, increase engagement, change policies or status, or maintain past gains. Organizations that can clearly define and illustrate how their program influences and brings about social change and social justice are strongly encouraged. To inform the deliberations, please provide programmatic and financial information. The deadline to submit a letter of intent (LOI) is Friday, November 13, 2020. Selected applicants will be invited to submit full proposals, due by Thursday February 18, 2021.

Required documentation for letters of intent (LOIs) includes proof of non-profit status, a projected two-year program budget, and a maximum 2-page (or 1,000 word) narrative. Required documentation for full proposals will be shared with applicants who advance to that stage.

Applicants are eligible for grants between $5,000 and $25,000 USD per-year. The grant term will be September 1, 2021 through August 31, 2023. 

Note: submission of a proposal does not guarantee funding.


Eligibility

  • Organizations in Israel that are a registered amuta with 46 status. 

  • New and existing programs are eligible for consideration. A grantee of Women of Vision may receive up to three cycles of funding. Once a grantee has reached the three cycle (six-year) threshold, they must take a one-cycle (two-year) funding hiatus.

  • Programs must focus on one of the following target areas: health & safety, empowerment, or economic security among women and/or girls.

  • Programs must articulate their social change vision. Please refer to the social change philanthropy guide enclosed below and include language applicable to your program. 


Strategic Funding Areas

Health and Safety: Recognizing the physical and mental health of women and girls as a human right and requirement to obtain full economic, religious, social and political achievement. Examples include but are not limited to:

  • domestic violence/victimization,

  • gun violence,

  • sex trafficking,

  • health & wellness.


Empowerment: Encouraging new and existing leaders among women and girls in ways that help them use their power and skills to affect social change, strengthen the Jewish community, gain personal empowerment and support aspiring female leaders. Examples include but are not limited to:

  • self-image,

  • education or life skills,

  • leadership development.

Economic Security: Increasing economic justice, financial stability and self-sufficiency for women and creating more fair and equal workplaces. Examples include but are not limited to:

  • economic empowerment,

  • professional development,

  • self-sufficiency,

  • legal reform. 

Process 

  • All letters of intent are due Friday, November 13, 2020.

  • Applications may be submitted through Jewish Federation of Greater Philadelphia’s web-based grant application platform:

  • Selected applicants will be contacted in January 2021, if they are asked to submit a full proposal. Additional information will be provided.


Questions may be directed to Talia Lidar, Manager, Israel Office, Jewish Federation at: tlidar@jewishphilly.org or 972.52.613.0757.


 Social Change Philanthropy

Women of Vision employs a social change philanthropy framework and does not provide funding for direct services. Below is a quick guide to Women of Vision’s definitions.  

Social Change Philanthropy focuses on the root causes of problems, working to improve the conditions that lead to inequality.  This approach is unlike traditional charity, which often seeks to ameliorate only the symptoms of societal problems, for example, by providing medicine and treatment for the sick, funds for the poor, or shelters for the homeless and battered.


How does social change occur?


Micro-level:  The change is reflected in the impact on individual lives.  For example: job attainment and retention, access to voting, access to reproductive rights and sex education. 

  

Macro-level:  The change is reflected in regional or national indicators.  For example: voting rates, teen pregnancy rates, unemployment rates, diminishing of environmental toxicity, reduction in gun violence.


Macro-level social change manifests itself in two primary ways:

  • Structural shifts in society’s institutions (usually policy driven):  anti-trafficking laws put into place, implementation of sex education in schools

  • Cultural shifts (usually driven by changes in behavior) couples sign legally binding pre-nuptial agreements that insure a “get” should the marriage fail. 

Social change categories:

  • A shift in Definition: the issue is defined differently in a community or society.

    • Example: rape is understood as an act of violence with legal and civil consequences, not as an act of transgression.  Often, small investment of resources can spark deep change, with the potential for profound impact.

  • A shift in Behavior: People in a community or society behave differently.

    • Example: women routinely self-conduct breast exams and obtain regular mammograms.  Often, small investment of resources can spark deep change, with the potential for profound impact.

  • A shift in Engagement: Advocacy and action are utilized as tools for reaching a critical mass to enable collective strength and impact.  

    • Example: Rabbis in a community agree to require the signing of a legally binding pre-nuptial agreement that insure a “get”.  To attain a shift in engagement usually requires large financial resources and years of attention, and multiple strategies.

  • A shift in Policies:  An institutional, organizational, or legislative policy or practice has changed and becomes the societal norm. These shifts usually require multiple years of investment, multiple strategies, and coalition building.

    • Example: local legislation is passed to increase minimum wage in a community.

  • Current position maintained: earlier progress on issues is maintained in the face of opposition.

    • Example: funding for breast cancer research is saved from budget cuts. Resources needed depend on the scale of resistance.  This work is complex and requires alignment and the collaboration of a wide array of groups and policy makers.

Apply
Open to
Organizations and individual applicants can apply.
Opens
Oct 15 2020 08:45 (EDT)